Genotype vs Phenotype: Examples and Definitions

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What is the definition of a genotype? 

In biology, a gene is a segment of deoxyribonucleic acid that encodes a trait. The accurate arrangement of nucleotides ( each composed of a phosphate group, carbohydrate and a base ) in a gene can differ between copies of the same gene. therefore, a gene can exist in different forms across organisms. These different forms are known as alleles. The demand fixed position on the chromosome that contains a particular gene is known as a locus.

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A diploid organism either inherits two copies of the lapp allele or one copy of two unlike alleles from their parents. If an individual inherits two identical alleles, their genotype is said to be homozygous at that venue.

however, if they possess two different alleles, their genotype is classed as heterozygous for that locus. Alleles of the same gene are either autosomal dominant or recessionary. An autosomal dominant allele will always be preferentially expressed over a recessive allele.

The subsequent combination of alleles that an individual possesses for a specific gene is their genotype.

Genotype examples

Let’s look at a classic example – eye color.

  • A gene encodes eye color.
  • In this example, the allele is either brown, or blue, with one inherited from the mother, and the other inherited from the father.
  • The brown allele is dominant (B), and the blue allele is recessive (b). If the child inherits two different alleles (heterozygous) then they will have brown eyes. For the child to have blue eyes, they must be homozygous for the blue eye allele. 

Image of brown and blue eyes that shows how eye color is inherited.

Figure 1: Inheritance chart detailing how an individual may inherit blue or brown eyes depending on the alleles carried by their parents, with the brown eye color allele being dominant and the blue eye color allele being recessive. 

other examples of genotype include :

  • Hair color
  • Height
  • Shoe size

What is the definition of a phenotype?

The sum of an organism ’ second discernible characteristics is their phenotype. A winder difference between phenotype and genotype is that, whilst genotype is inherited from an organism ’ s parents, the phenotype is not.

Whilst a phenotype is influenced the genotype, genotype does not peer phenotype. The phenotype is influenced by the genotype and factors including :

  • Epigenetic modifications
  • Environmental and lifestyle factors 

Flamingos eating fish out of basket and changing color.
name 2 : Flamingos are naturally white in color, it is only the pigments in the organisms that they eat that cause them to turn vibrantly pink .

Phenotype examples

Environmental factors that may influence the phenotype include nutrition, temperature, humidity and stress. Flamingos are a classic example of how the environment influences the phenotype. Whilst renowned for being vibrantly pink, their natural color is white – the pink color is caused by pigments in the organisms in their diet.

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A second example is an individual’s skin color. Our genes control the amount and type of melanin that we produce, however, exposure to UV light in sunny climates causes the darkening of existing melanin and encourages increased melanogenesis and thus darker skin.

Genotype vs phenotype: observing 

Observing the phenotype is simple – we take a look at an organism’s outward features and characteristics, and form conclusions about them. Observing the genotype, however, is a little more complex.

Genotyping is the process by which differences in the genotype of an individual are analyzed using biological assays. The data obtained can then be compared against either a second individual’s sequence, or a database of sequences.

Previously, genotyping would enable only partial sequences to be obtained. Now, thanks to major technological advances in recent years, state-of-the-art environmental factors that may influence the phenotype include nutrition, temperature, humidity and tension. Flamingos are a authoritative exercise of how the environment influences the phenotype. Whilst renowned for being vibrantly pink, their natural color is whiten – the pink tinge is caused by pigments in the organisms in their diet.A second exercise is an individual ‘s peel color. Our genes control the sum and type of melanin that we produce, however, exposure to UV light in cheery climates causes the darken of existing melanin and encourages increased melanogenesis and frankincense dark skin.Observing the phenotype is simpleton – we take a count at an organism ’ s outbound features and characteristics, and form conclusions about them. Observing the genotype, however, is a small more complex.Genotyping is the process by which differences in the genotype of an individual are analyzed using biological assays. The data obtained can then be compared against either a irregular individual ’ south sequence, or a database of sequences.Previously, genotyping would enable merely partial sequences to be obtained. now, thanks to major technical advances in holocene years, state-of-the-art unharmed genome sequencing

A workflow showing the steps of whole genome sequencing digit 3 : A work flow depicting the diverse steps of whole genome sequence ( WGS ) .

(WGS) allows entire sequences to be obtained. An efficient process that is increasingly affordable, WGS involves using high-throughput sequencing techniques such as

WGS is not the only way to analyze an organism’s genome – a variety of methods are available. ( WGS ) allows integral sequences to be obtained. An efficient work that is increasingly low-cost, WGS involves using high-throughput sequencing techniques such as single-molecule real-time ( SMRT ) sequencing to identify the raw succession of nucleotides constituting an organism ’ sulfur DNA.WGS is not the only way to analyze an organism ’ s genome – a variety of methods are available.

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Why is it important to study genotype vs phenotype? 

Understanding the relationship between a genotype and phenotype can be extremely useful in a variety of research areas.

A particularly interesting area is

Making use of genotyping and phenotyping techniques in tandem appear to be better than using genotype tests alone. In a comparative clinical pharmacogenomics Understanding the relationship between a genotype and phenotype can be extremely utilitarian in a variety of research areas.A peculiarly matter to area is pharmacogenomics. familial variations can occur in liver enzymes required for drug metabolism, such as CYP450. Therefore, an individual ’ south phenotype, i.e. their ability to metabolize a particular drug, may vary depending on which form of the enzyme-encoding gene they possess. For pharmaceutical companies and physicians, this cognition is key for determining recommend drug dosages across populations.Making use of genotyping and phenotyping techniques in tandem appear to be better than using genotype tests alone. In a comparative clinical pharmacogenomics analyze, a multiplexing set about identified greater differences in drug metamorphosis capacity than was predicted by genotyping alone. This has important implications for personalized music and highlights the need to be timid when entirely relying on genotyping.

How can we study the relationship between genotype and phenotype?

Using animal models such as mice, scientists can genetically modify an organism so that it no longer expresses a specific gene – known as

The

Genotype vs phenotype chart:

Using animal models such as mice, scientists can genetically modify an organism so that it no longer expresses a specific gene – known as knockout mouse. By comparing the phenotype of this animal to the hazardous type phenotype ( i.e. the phenotype that exists when the gene has not been removed ), we can study the character of certain genes in delivering certain phenotypes.The Mouse Genome Informatics ( MGI ) inaugural has compiled a database of thousands of phenotypes that can be created and studied, and the genes that must be knocked out to produce each specific phenotype.

Genotype

Phenotype

Definition

The set of genes in our DNA which are responsible for a particular trait
An organism’s observable characteristics and traits

Characterized by

Genotyping techniques such as WGS
Observing an organism ’ s outward characteristics

Depends on

The gene sequences an organism possesses
Genotype, PLUS epigenetics and environmental factors

Inherited?

YesNo

Example

Genes encoding eye color
An individual with brown eyes

Let ’ s count at a authoritative model – eye color .

reference : https://livingcorner.com.au
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